Zoom-in Talk:Discover Salford: Chapel St – University

Date: Wednesday 24th March 19:00 GMT

With Alexandra Fairclough, Green Badge Guide for the Bridgewater Canal

An entertaining and factual tour of the buildings people and places that make this globally important but often overlooked interesting city.

Grab yourself a coffee or tipple and sit comfortably in your favourite armchair. I will then step back in time to show you how our city evolved. Firstly it was a county which included the hamlet of Manchester, then it became the centre of the world.

Unfortunately it was then overtaken in prominence by the powerhouse we know as Manchester. Using maps and images, we will discover people and communities that created Salford and their achievements.

Starting at Greengage Square and travelling up the A6 we will look at Chapel Street and The Crescent and its environment. We’ll also take a peek at a few other important Salford landmarks too, including a glimpse of Worsley. 

Hopefully, afterwards you will look at the streets and buildings in a different light. I look forward to meeting you all online.

Cost: £5 plus booking fee

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/zoom-in-talkdiscover-salford-chapel-st-uni-tickets-116594570499

27th March The Water Road to Manchester – A Bridgewater Canal virtual tour

Booking Link: https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/145545260793

Sat, 27 March 2021 16:00 – 17:00 GMT

The Bridgewater Canal in Salford contains the oldest and the youngest parts of the 39 miles of the UK’s first commercial canal.

Explore this five-mile stretch of history where we will learn about how the area embraced coal, cotton, Suffragettes, brilliant engineers (and their engineering – mostly but not always.)

See the Castle in the Air and a cathedral in miniature – and how this all came about because of a lovelorn nobleman and a very important wheel of Cheshire cheese.

Look out for ‘God forgotten’ Worsley, the church built to enlighten them, a lighthouse 30 miles from the sea and the world’s only swing aqueduct at Barton.

Tickets to America, ghost stories, royalty and the weight of the world all feature in this virtual tour by Elizabeth Charnley, Green Badge guide for the Bridgewater Canal in Salford.

17th March Zoom-in Talks – A History of GB by Nursery Rhymes

with Alexandra Fairclough, Green Badge Guide for the Bridgewater Canal

We all love nursery rhymes but do we understand the possible meanings behind them? Join me to explore the dark side of the nursery rhyme!

When? Wed, March 17, 2021 7:00 PM – 8:15 PM GMT

Every culture in the world has invented  songs and rhymes for its’ young.  Did you know they were a way of spreading news through a generally illiterate society much like social media were a method of gossiping too.

Of course the distinctive sing-song metre, tonality and rhythm that characterises ‘motherese’, has a proven evolutionary value and this is reflected in the very nature of nursery rhymes. Whilst we all know the benefits of nursery rhymes which includes emotional connections and language development do we really understand their possible meanings.  They tell us the history of our island through coded words. Its truly fascinating.

Join me, a former early years music practitioner, to learn the amazing histories and theories behind our great nursery rhymes.

This zoom talk is open to all regardless of age, geographic location, etc. and since it is an online/virtual event via Zoom you can connect from anywhere in the world.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/zoom-in-talks-a-history-of-gb-by-nursery-rhymes-tickets-142113985757

EXPLORE WORSLEY – A VIRTUAL TOUR

Explore the picturesque village…but all is not what it seems! Hear the story of 3 stately homes & the houses in this beautiful village.

A talk by Alexandra Fairclough Green Badge Guide for the Bridgewater Canal

Sat February 27th 2021 7:00 – 8:15 PM GMT

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/explore-worsley-a-virtual-tour-tickets-139020747799

Grab yourself a coffee or tipple and sit comfortably in your favourite armchair. I will then step back in time to show you how wonderful Worsley evolved. Its history is hidden from obvious view.  Using maps and images, we will discover people and communities that created this famous cradle of the industrial revolution including famous people and their achievements and lesser known men and women whose blood and sweat we benefit from today. 

Hopefully, afterwards you will look at the streets and buildings in a different light. I look forward to meeting you all online.

Bridgewater Guided Tours set fee for virtual tours is £8 per household but as an introductory offer I’m doing a limited number of early bird price of £5 per household plus booking fee. When the early bird tickets are gone – they’re gone, so book now! 

I’m donating my profit to Worsley Civic Trust and History Society to help support them. 

This zoom talk is open to all regardless of age, geographic location, etc. and since it is an online/virtual event via Zoom you can connect from anywhere in the world.

Zoom events have a limit on the number of people that can participate and therefore the event may “sell-out” once a certain number of registrations has been reached.

Min number is 10 participants to go ahead. (Full refund if it doesn’t go ahead).

Zoom connection link will be emailed.

Login info will emailed approximately 8-24 hours prior to the event to those that registered through the Eventbrite.

If you’ve successfully registered you’ll receive an email confirmation from Eventbrite.

If you haven’t received the Zoom connection an hour before the event feel free to contact me.

Zoom Connection Suggestions:

Connecting to Zoom a few minutes early is strongly recommended.

This is a visual presentation so the bigger device screen that you can use the better.

To join the event simply click the Zoom link that is emailed separately and follow the instructions.

If clicking the link doesn’t work you can try copying and pasting it instead.

Depending on the device Zoom may work better in some browsers/devices than others – if one doesn’t work try another.

If you are disconnected for any reason please just reconnect.

When all else fails please read and follow the directions. : )

Bollards!

On Worsley Green there is an iron bollard sat on its own and looking very out of place.

Worsley Yard Iron Bollard

Have you ever wondered why it is there?

What is a bollard?

A bollard is a sturdy, short, vertical post and originally described a post on a ship or wharf used principally for using ropes to secure boats.

The word is probably related to bole, referring to a tree trunk.

From the 17th and 18th centuries, old cannon were often buried muzzle first to be used as bollards on quaysides.

From the 19th century bollards were purpose-made, but often inherited a similar “cannon” shape.

What about our bollard?

Worsley Green used to be a busy industrial yard dating from the opening of the Bridgewater Canal in 1761. The yard built up around the Delph area to service the mines and canal at Worsley. It was not until the early 20th century that the yard was turned into the green that we know today. Our bollard is one of the last remnants of Worsley Yard.

Railways

An Ordnance Survey (OS) map from 1848 shows a mineral railway from Sanderson Pit (colliery), just east of Roe Green to the coal staithe on the canal at Worsley. At the time the coal wagons were moved by gravity and horses.

In 1864 the Eccles, Tyldesley & Wigan Railway opened which ran through Worsley Woods between Monton Green and Roe Green. It was connected to the mineral railway at Sanderson’s Siding. This led to the first steam locomotive being delivered to Worsley Yard in 1870 to replace horsepower and a branch line with an engine shed was built.

The OS map from around 1900 shows the area of the yard and the railway with location of new houses and green superimposed:

The bollard is opposite house No.146 and is shown on the map next to the railway that crossed the yard.  It was close to the engine shed and was possibly used to tie up locomotive or wagons.

In 1905 the yard was cleared of almost all evidence of its industrial past and the houses we see today were built around what we now know as Worsley green.  All that remains is the base of the yard chimney which became the Duke of Bridgewater memorial, the sluice for the culverted Worsley Brook, the ‘ghosts’ of the railway sleepers…And of course, our own ‘Worsley Yard Iron Bollard’ which is now over 150 years old and if sentient would have stories to tell.

Map of Worsley Green: From Ordnance Survey map survey of 1889, revised in 1904 and published 1908 (Image copied from Alan Godfrey Maps edition published 2003).

Thanks for additional detail of houses built around the Green and map provided by John Aldred.

Written by Mark Charnley, Bridgewater Canal Green Badge Guide.

Worsley Wonder 2021

The Bridgewater Canal Guides hope that you have all had a happy, safe and healthy Christmas.

It’s been a difficult year for everyone but we are hoping that our tours can carry on growing in 2021.

When government guidelines allow, we will run our Worsley Wonder tours on the first Saturday of the month in 2021. Small groups according to the latest guidelines whatever they may be, and of course social distancing always.

March and April’s tours will also sadly not go ahead, but please check back as we hope to be back up and running as soon as possible within government guidelines.

Why not check out one of our Online Talks?

Eccles Cakes

Eccles cakes are a sweet pastry cake filled with dried fruits, usually currants and raisins, sugar, spices and sometimes butter.

The true origins of the cake are not known but the first recorded recipe for something like an Eccles Cake and called “sweet patties” was published by Elizabeth Raffald, housekeeper at Arley Hall, Cheshire in 1769 as part of a book of 800 recipes.  The recipe included boiled calf’s foot as well as dried fruit.

In 1793, James Birch opened a bakery in Eccles and started to sell cakes similar to Elizabeth Raffald’s sweet patties and they quickly became known as Eccles cakes. 

Eccles cakes proved very popular and were exported to Australia, America, the West Indies and Spain.  Alcohol was added (usually brandy or rum) as a preservative for exported cakes.

Eccles cakes do not have protected status as that afforded to Stilton cheese or Melton Mowbray pork pies, so they are made and sold in many countries across the world.

Few places make Eccles cakes commercially in Eccles now.  The major manufacturer is the Real Lancashire Eccles Cake company which is in Ardwick, Manchester.  A local commercial bakery, Quayside, on the Lyntown industrial estate beside the railway between Eccles and Patricroft stations is the largest producer locally in Eccles.  Two local small bakeries also make their own Eccles cakes: Law’s bakery on Parrin Lane, Winton, Eccles (near Monton church) and Wards Bakery on Barton Lane.

In 2004 and again in 2013, Eccles cakes made national headlines as Greggs bakery stopped selling Eccles cakes in all its shops, claiming there was no market for them, customers preferring chocolate cakes and muffins.  In 2013, during the Eccles Cake Festival, they again refused to stock them, even in their Eccles branch.

Lancashire Fire service have reported that Eccles cakes can catch fire if heated in a microwave oven, possibly due to the sugar content so if you prefer warm Eccles cakes, it is best to reheat them in the oven.

In the 2013 Eccles cake festival there was a competition called the “Great Eccles Cake-off” to find the best amateur bakers including the best Eccles cake.  The winner, a Mrs E Charnley of Eccles, received one dozen Eccles cakes as a prize (!)

So, love them or loathe them, call them dead fly cakes, fly pies, fly cemeteries, sweet patties, eat them hot or cold, from a famous chef recipe or an old favourite, enjoy this fine and tasty treat from Eccles, preferably one of the locally made ones!

Elizabeth Charnley is a Green Badge Guide for the Bridgewater Canal.

Check out her website www.charnleysoutdoors.com to contact her directly.

Coal, Cotton and Canal Tour -COVID UPDATE

IMPORTANT: COVID-19 STATEMENT
Event Postponement 07/11/2020

As the Government has advised that we are living in a second spike of Coronavirus [Covid-19], I have postponed the Coal, Cotton and Canal Tour at Lancashire Mining Museum scheduled for 07/11. Your ticket will be rolled over to a new date. This will be uploaded on the Bridgewater Guided Tours, Manchester Guided Tours webpages and my Eventbrite page as soon as government guidelines allow.

Event Cancellation
If the event can not be rescheduled, then you will be entitled to a full refund.
Thank you for bearing with me.

Staysafe #supportheritage

7th November 2020 Start time 1pm

Join me for a fun and factual walk exploring the secrets of the past of the Bridgewater Canal and its villages inc Astley Green and Chat Moss.
At Astley Green, we will walk through the village and there will be opportunity to look around the museum, see the last Pit Head Gear of the Lancashire Coalfield and take a break in the museum cafe​.
Using maps and visual aids, we’ll take a look at the village and hear its history. We’ll learn about nearby treasure hoards, headless bodies, skulls of martyrs, mining disasters and the Miners Cathedral.

We also explore the impact that the canal, coal and cotton had on local men women and children.


This tour will be approximately 2 miles and will take 1.5-2 hours.


On the day of your tour: Please arrive at the meeting place 10 minutes before the start of the tour.


Meetat gates of Lancashire Mining Museum

Astley Green Colliery M29 7JB


Booking and Cancellations:

Tour Tickets £12 per person which includes the booking fee. You are advised to buy tickets in advance as tours will not go ahead without minimum booking numbers for safety reasons.

Worsley Wonder Tour

Alexa Fairclough Monument Worsley

IMPORTANT: COVID-19 STATEMENT
Event Cancelled 07/11/2020

As the Government has advised that we are living in a second spike of Coronavirus [Covid-19] our Worsley Wonder Tour for November has unfortunately been cancelled.

All those booked have been contacted and given the option to defer to another date or cancel and refund. If for some reason you have not received this, please contact us and we can arrange this for you.

bridgewatercanalguidedtours@gmail.com

We hope that the December tour will be allowed to run however we will follow government guidelines as the stand in December.

Thank you for your understanding and please stay safe.

Join our regular tours of Worsley by fully qualified Green Badge guides for the Bridgewater Canal in Salford

Next Tour: Saturday 7th November 2020

11am Meet outside the Delph Bar & Restaurant

Booking recommended.

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/121177349715

Can’t make it in November? Don’t worry there’s always December!

Saturday 5th December 2020

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/121182330613

Worsley Delph

by Alexandra Fairclough

The newly refurbished Delph, Worsley

Looking today at the recently refurbished Worsley Delph, we can see a floodlit cross feature set within a distinctive stone-faced water filled hollow. This former stone quarry was used for many of the local buildings but it was the start of the Bridgewater Canal, the cradle of the Industrial Revolution.

Francis Egerton, the third Duke of Bridgewater, wanted to mine his coal deposits out of his land.  Coal had been mined in Lancashire for centuries but the Worsley mines ran deep and kept flooding.  Influenced by his father’s idea to drain the mines, Francis Egerton decided to cut a water course to help reduce flooding, access and retrieve the coal and also transport it to market.

In 1761, the Bridgewater Canal from Worsley Delph to Manchester was completed. Coal from the Worsley colliery canal tunnels and other local pits could get to market quickly and more cheaply than ever before.

The main consumers for this coal initially were households for cooking and heating, however, a constant and much cheaper supply led to demand from industry such as brick-making, metal trades, glass-making and eventually to larger scale manufacturing industries involving imported raw cotton. Due to fact that almost 50% of the world’s raw cotton was manufactured in the 19th century was  traded from Manchester, it became a wealthy city known as ‘Cottonopolis’.

Learn more about the Worsley Delph, the mines, the people who created or visited the canal and the meaning of the public art on one of our Worsley Tours. The Creative Worsley tour also includes the artists musicians architects and writers associated with the first cut canal in England.

Alexandra runs regular tours around the Bridgewater canal.

To contact her visit http://Alexatours.eventbrite.com

Book our next Worsley tour here

Saturday 3rd October 2020

11am Meet outside the Delph Bar & Restaurant

https://worselywonderguidedtour.eventbrite.co.uk